Online shopping takes away sense of community | Opinion | victoriaadvocate.com – Victoria Advocate - eComEmpireStore + Brought to You By: Robert Villapane Ramos

Online shopping takes away sense of community | Opinion | victoriaadvocate.com – Victoria Advocate

Clear skies. Low 47F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph.. Clear skies. Low 47F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph. Updated: November 26, 2022 @ 4:08 pmHey, JoAnne, do you want to go to the mall, do some shopping and then meet up with some friends for lunch?Invitations like this once were commonplace […]



Clear skies. Low 47F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph..
Clear skies. Low 47F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph.
Updated: November 26, 2022 @ 4:08 pm
Hey, JoAnne, do you want to go to the mall, do some shopping and then meet up with some friends for lunch?
Invitations like this once were commonplace in communities.
As were conversations with friends and neighbors we would see while we were at the mall or anywhere else we may shop.
But that is changing as more people opt to shop online instead of in the stores.
It is also changing our sense of community.
The demand for online shopping took off at the beginning of the pandemic when stores were closed and people could not go out to shop.
The convenience of online shopping has stuck as we resume our pre-pandemic lives. With online shopping we can shop whenever we want no matter the time of day or wherever we may be.
Clicking a button on an electronic device to make a purchase is creating a solitary atmosphere that requires, for the most part, no interaction with another person to complete the transaction.
It also increases the chance of not running into a friend or neighbor while shopping as happens during in-store shopping.
Online sales are expected to reach $1.1 trillion in 2023, up from $875 billion this year, according to zippia.com.
With online shopping, we are losing the sense of community that comes with brick-and-mortar shopping. By shopping in-store we are not only helping businesses do well, but we are also connecting with the community. We gain a sense of belonging to the community when we are out and about and see our neighbors and friends and can stop and chat for a few minutes.
We can find new stores and new products by getting out and driving to a shopping center or the mall.
We also can make new friends by making conversation with shoppers who are in the same area of the store as we are or are waiting to check out.
Let’s face it, in-person shopping is a very social event.
It also revitalizes our sense of well-being to get out and mingle with strangers.
We need interaction with other people to keep our connection with the community strong.
In-store shopping also provides in-person customer service and ease in returning a product.
But all is not lost, researchers say in-store shopping appears to be making a comeback.
“Despite online shopping becoming much more prevalent, the vast majority of shoppers still make purchases in-store. This reduces shipping costs, allows shoppers to take advantage of special discounts, and allows customers to see products before making a purchase,” according to a blog on paymentcloudinc.com/.
The National Retail Federation projected more than 114 million people would shop on Black Friday.
“Of the 114.9 million potential Black Friday shoppers, 67% say they’re planning to head to stores this year. This is up from 64% last year,” said Katherine Cullen, senior director, Industry and Consumer Insights with the National Retail Federation.
Online shopping and instore shopping can co-exist. It makes sense to do research online before heading to the brick-and-mortar store to make the purchase. But we must continue to shop in stores to support our businesses.
It is good for business.
It is good for the community.
This opinion reflects the views of the Victoria Advocate’s editorial board.
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